Moving To Make A Kinect-ion

I remember when the Wii was first announced. I loved the idea. I was even a vocal defender of it’s name. As soon as I could, I went and placed a pre-order with my Friendly Local Video Game Store. I got my Wii not long after launch due to the delays by the time the system went on sale in Europe, and I was blown away by how much fun it was playing Wii Sports with a group of friends. On the other hand, I was left cold by Zelda: Twilight Princess. Not because it was a bad game, but because swinging a controller around in an action-RPG felt clunky and uncomfortable compared to using a keyboard and mouse or a control pad.

My impressions of the Wii remained that it was very much a party machine. The games I had the most fun with were the ones which emphasised group play, like WarioWare: Smooth Moves, Rayman Raving Rabbids and MarioKart Wii. Eventually, I realised that I just didn’t play my Wii enough even when I did have people round. I traded it in when I moved to Edinburgh. I don’t regret selling my Wii for a second.

My experience with the Wii should really be enough to put me off both PS Move and Kinect for Xbox 360. One is pretty much a copy of the Wii’s control system with claims to be more accurate while the other is an unknown quantity with more similarities to unsuccessful control systems for the PlayStation Eye and Xbox Live Vision then anything else. Yet, I find myself vaguely drawn towards both systems.

The game which really has me interested in the PlayStation Move is Time Crisis: Razing Storm. This is a new, expanded edition of Time Crisis 4, released specifically for the Move. It also comes with two other rail-shooter games, including one pirate based one which looks like absurd, silly fun. I had great fun in my student union playing Time Crisis 3 and I’d love to be able to do that with my friends at home. I’m also interested to see how Little Big Planet 2 (the sequel to the PS3’s most successful game) and EchoChrome 2 (sequel to a rather nice PSP puzzle game) will make use of the controller.

Sadly, three games which look pretty damned good just aren’t enough to justify spending £100 on a Playstation Eye, two controllers and two navigation controllers. A few more interesting looking games might have me persuaded, but the list of games which are intended to use Move looks quite uninspiring, with many of the games likely to be perfectly playable with a normal DuelShock3 controller. There are also some games which look a bit rubbish and similar to the shovelware titles which have flooded the Wii games market.

If the line up for the Move is uninspiring, then I’m not sure what that makes the Kinect line-up. Of the games announced so far, the only two which I intend to buy are Fable III and Forza Motorsports 4, both of which are likely to be excellant and work perfectly with my existing gamepads. I have absolutely no interest in any of the other games, although I’m sure that Microsoft’s flagship titles – Adventures, Joy Ride, Sports and Kinectimals won’t actually be bad. I’m also dubious about how well the control system will actually work in the real world.

My skeptiscism about Kinect isn’t helped by the fact that I already own an Xbox Live Vision Camera, which was not a worthwhile investment. It came with two games which it was used as a controller for, one of which was called Totemball. It was pretty much unplayable. To quote GameSpot (via MetaCritic):

If you already have the camera, you might as well download TotemBall. But don’t expect to get much enjoyment out of it.

Maybe I’m being a bit too harsh on Kinect. After all, Microsoft has given me around five years of enjoyable gaming, using controllers which fit my hands comfortably (as compared to PlayStation controllers, the PSP and DS Lite, which I find uncomfortable to use). They’ve also had a lot of good exclusive and first-party games, many of which I still play regularly. Ok, so my first Xbox did RROD (thanks to Fable II), but I can forgive these things.

So I’m not going to write Kinect off altogether…yet. I’m quite open to the fact that it might help change my perception of how to control a game in the same way that the iPad and iPhone changed my perceptions of how we should be interacting with computers (something which is being realised in the form of Microsoft Surface). I won’t be holding my breath…but then I never expected to be as impressed with my iPhone as I was.

Sony and Microsoft are both making allusions to Move and Kinect being extensions of their respective system; a stepping stone which will turn 7th generation consoles into the 8th generation. I don’t really buy that, and I don’t think that either the Xbox or the PS3 are suddenly going to steal the Wii’s casual and party gamer market. Rather, I think that both MS and Sony are going to fail to sell many Move and Kinect devices. Mostly because the number of gamers who own both an Xbox or a PS3 and a Wii is vast. Gamers are fickle creatures however, and the lure of motion gameplay with high quality graphics may be too much for some. We’ll have to wait and see.

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  1. Pingback: Thoughts At The Kinect Launch | Games of State

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